Fossils

Songs that birds 'sing' in their dreams translated into sound

New Scientist - Fri, 04/19/2024 - 12:00pm
By measuring how birds’ vocal muscles move while they are asleep and using a physical model for how those muscles produce sound, researchers have pulled songs from the minds of sleeping birds
Categories: Fossils

Fossil snake discovered in India may have been the largest ever

New Scientist - Thu, 04/18/2024 - 11:00am
The vertebrae of Vasuki indicus, a snake that lived 47 million years ago, suggest it could have been as long as 15 metres
Categories: Fossils

First evidence of human occupation in lava tube cave in Saudi Arabia

Science Daily - Fossils - Wed, 04/17/2024 - 5:27pm
New research has highlighted an area in Arabia that once acted as a key point for cultural exchanges and trades amongst ancient people -- and it all took place in vast caves and lava tubes that have remained largely untapped reservoirs of archaeological abundance in Arabia. Through meticulous excavation and analysis, the international team uncovered a wealth of evidence at Umm Jirsan, spanning from the Neolithic to the Chalcolithic/Bronze Age periods (~10,000-3,500 years ago).
Categories: Fossils

Ice age climate analysis reduces worst-case warming expected from rising CO2

Science Daily - Paleontology - Wed, 04/17/2024 - 5:27pm
A detailed reconstruction of climate during the most recent ice age, when a large swath of North America was covered in ice, provides information on the relationship between CO2 and global temperature. Results show that while most future warming estimates remain unchanged, the absolute worst-case scenario is unlikely.
Categories: Fossils

Paleontologists unearth what may be the largest known marine reptile

Science Daily - Paleontology - Wed, 04/17/2024 - 5:26pm
The fossilized remains of a second gigantic jawbone measuring more than two meters long has been found on a beach in Somerset, UK.
Categories: Fossils

Paleontologists unearth what may be the largest known marine reptile

Science Daily - Fossils - Wed, 04/17/2024 - 5:26pm
The fossilized remains of a second gigantic jawbone measuring more than two meters long has been found on a beach in Somerset, UK.
Categories: Fossils

Ancient marine reptile found on UK beach may be the largest ever

New Scientist - Wed, 04/17/2024 - 2:00pm
The jawbone of an ichthyosaur uncovered in south-west England has been identified as a new species, and researchers estimate that the whole animal was 20 to 25 metres long
Categories: Fossils

Ancient marine reptile found on UK beach may be the largest ever

New Scientist - Wed, 04/17/2024 - 2:00pm
The jawbone of an ichthyosaur uncovered in south-west England has been identified as a new species, and researchers estimate that the whole animal was 20 to 25 metres long
Categories: Fossils

Marine plankton behavior could predict future marine extinctions

Science Daily - Paleontology - Wed, 04/17/2024 - 12:11pm
Marine communities migrated to Antarctica during the Earth's warmest period in 66 million years long before a mass-extinction event.
Categories: Fossils

Genetic variant identified that shaped the human skull base

Science Daily - Paleontology - Wed, 04/17/2024 - 12:10pm
Researchers have identified a variant in the gene TBX1 as key in the development of the unique morphology at the base of the skull. TBX1 is present at higher levels in humans than in closely related hominins. Low TBX1 also occurs in certain genetic conditions causing altered skull base morphology. This study provides a greater understanding of human disease and evolution.
Categories: Fossils

Interspecies competition led to even more forms of ancient human -- defying evolutionary trends in vertebrates

Science Daily - Paleontology - Wed, 04/17/2024 - 12:10pm
Competition between species played a major role in the rise and fall of hominins -- and produced a 'bizarre' evolutionary pattern for the Homo lineage -- according to a new study that revises the start and end dates for many of our early ancestors.
Categories: Fossils

Turning plants blue with gene editing could make robot weeding easier

New Scientist - Wed, 04/17/2024 - 11:00am
Weeding robots can sometimes struggle to tell weeds from crops, but genetically modifying the plants we want to keep to make them brightly coloured would make the job easier, suggest a group of researchers
Categories: Fossils

Turning plants blue with gene editing could make robot weeding easier

New Scientist - Wed, 04/17/2024 - 11:00am
Weeding robots can sometimes struggle to tell weeds from crops, but genetically modifying the plants we want to keep to make them brightly coloured would make the job easier, suggest a group of researchers
Categories: Fossils

Turning plants blue with gene editing could make robot weeding easier

New Scientist - Wed, 04/17/2024 - 11:00am
Weeding robots can sometimes struggle to tell weeds from crops, but genetically modifying the plants we want to keep to make them brightly coloured would make the job easier, suggest a group of researchers
Categories: Fossils

A cicada double brood is coming – it's less rare than you think

New Scientist - Wed, 04/17/2024 - 9:53am
Up to 17 US states could be peppered with more than a trillion cicadas this spring, and though it has been a while since these two specific broods emerged at once, double broods are not that rare
Categories: Fossils

A cicada double brood is coming – it's less rare than you think

New Scientist - Wed, 04/17/2024 - 9:53am
Up to 17 US states could be peppered with more than a trillion cicadas this spring, and though it has been a while since these two specific broods emerged at once, double broods are not that rare
Categories: Fossils

A cicada double brood is coming – it's less rare than you think

New Scientist - Wed, 04/17/2024 - 9:53am
Up to 17 US states could be peppered with more than a trillion cicadas this spring, and though it has been a while since these two specific broods emerged at once, double broods are not that rare
Categories: Fossils

Colonies of single-celled creatures could explain how embryos evolved

New Scientist - Wed, 04/17/2024 - 1:00am
We know little about how embryonic development in animals evolved from single-celled ancestors, but simple organisms with a multicellular life stage offer intriguing clues
Categories: Fossils

Colonies of single-celled creatures could explain how embryos evolved

New Scientist - Wed, 04/17/2024 - 1:00am
We know little about how embryonic development in animals evolved from single-celled ancestors, but simple organisms with a multicellular life stage offer intriguing clues
Categories: Fossils

Colonies of single-celled creatures could explain how embryos evolved

New Scientist - Wed, 04/17/2024 - 1:00am
We know little about how embryonic development in animals evolved from single-celled ancestors, but simple organisms with a multicellular life stage offer intriguing clues
Categories: Fossils

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