Paleo in the News

Paleontology: New fossil fish genus discovered

Science Daily - Paleontology - 7 hours 22 min ago
Paleontologists have identified a new genus of fossil goby, revealing evolutionary secrets of a lineage that stretches back millions of years.
Categories: Fossils

Paleontology: New fossil fish genus discovered

Science Daily - Fossils - 7 hours 22 min ago
Paleontologists have identified a new genus of fossil goby, revealing evolutionary secrets of a lineage that stretches back millions of years.
Categories: Fossils

Ancient ocean slowdown warns of future climate chaos

Science Daily - Paleontology - 7 hours 24 min ago
When it comes to the ocean's response to global warming, we're not in entirely uncharted waters. A new study shows that episodes of extreme heat in Earth's past caused the exchange of waters from the surface to the deep ocean to decline.
Categories: Fossils

Ancient ocean slowdown warns of future climate chaos

Science Daily - Fossils - 7 hours 24 min ago
When it comes to the ocean's response to global warming, we're not in entirely uncharted waters. A new study shows that episodes of extreme heat in Earth's past caused the exchange of waters from the surface to the deep ocean to decline.
Categories: Fossils

No bones about it: 100-million-year-old bones reveal new species of pterosaur

Science Daily - Paleontology - Wed, 06/12/2024 - 10:33am
New research has identified 100-million-year-old fossilized bones discovered in western Queensland as belonging to a newly identified species of pterosaur, which was a formidable flying reptile that lived among the dinosaurs.
Categories: Fossils

No bones about it: 100-million-year-old bones reveal new species of pterosaur

Science Daily - Fossils - Wed, 06/12/2024 - 10:33am
New research has identified 100-million-year-old fossilized bones discovered in western Queensland as belonging to a newly identified species of pterosaur, which was a formidable flying reptile that lived among the dinosaurs.
Categories: Fossils

Australian pterosaur had a huge tongue to help gulp down prey

New Scientist - Wed, 06/12/2024 - 5:55am
Scientists have identified a new species of pterosaur from a 100-million-year-old fossil in Australia, which appears to have had a massive tongue to push prey down its throat
Categories: Fossils

Elephants seem to invent names for each other

New Scientist - Mon, 06/10/2024 - 11:00am
An analysis of their vocalisations suggests that African savannah elephants invent names for each other, making them the only animals other than humans thought to do so
Categories: Fossils

A surprisingly quick enzyme could shift our understanding of evolution

New Scientist - Mon, 06/10/2024 - 9:00am
Biological processes such as DNA replication or cellular structure formation may become more accurate when done as quickly as possible, offering new hints into life's origins
Categories: Fossils

Bacteria evolve to get better at evolving in lab experiment

New Scientist - Mon, 06/10/2024 - 7:00am
When bacteria were put in alternating environments, some became better at evolving to cope with the changes – evidence that “evolvability” can be gained through natural selection
Categories: Fossils

Tiny new species of great ape lived in Germany 11 million years ago

Science Daily - Paleontology - Fri, 06/07/2024 - 2:15pm
Ancient apes in Germany co-existed by partitioning resources in their environment, according to a new study.
Categories: Fossils

Tiny new species of great ape lived in Germany 11 million years ago

Science Daily - Fossils - Fri, 06/07/2024 - 2:15pm
Ancient apes in Germany co-existed by partitioning resources in their environment, according to a new study.
Categories: Fossils

Tiny great ape fossils identified as new species from Europe

New Scientist - Fri, 06/07/2024 - 2:00pm
A kneecap and two teeth found in Germany have been identified as belonging to a new species of ape from 11.6 million years ago, thought to have weighed as little as 10 kilograms
Categories: Fossils

Male lemurs grow bigger testicles when there are other males around

New Scientist - Fri, 06/07/2024 - 7:00am
Dominant male Verreaux’s sifakas always have the largest testicles in their group to make the most sperm, and they can grow their gonads to make sure of it
Categories: Fossils
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